Upcoming Webinar: November 18, 2021 @ 12:30 P.M. (ET)  |  Building Internal Independent Investigation Systems  |  Register Today!

Serious insight for serious situations.

Serious insight for serious situations.

I’ve lost my report writing mojo! Now what?

How many of you can relate to that feeling of relief and maybe even joy when you are “oh so close” to completing a task. As a workplace investigator, I can definitely relate. In my experience, it is a great feeling knowing that I am close to placing a checkmark beside an investigation and moving that investigation file to the “closed” section of my files.

Read More

Whistleblower series: What do workplace whistleblowers report?

In the last blog in this series, I wrote about the reporting channels that organizations may use to allow whistleblowers to report wrongdoing. In this blog, I’ve provided an overview of the types of wrongdoing that whistleblowers report. I’ve chosen this topic because many may be unfamiliar with what workplace whistleblowing actually “looks” like. While it is true that we at times hear about whistleblowing in the media, the cases we hear about may not be a good representation of the types of wrongdoing that workplace whistleblowers typically report.

Read More

How an interview with an NBA great can help you write better workplace investigation reports

In my last blog, I wrote about the importance of plain language. I wanted to do one more blog on this because I came across a “real life” example that illustrates the point nicely. I’m definitely not one for sports analogies and stories. First, not everyone can understand or relate to them. Second, they bore me a little (especially any story that involves a detailed play-by-play). But for this blog, I had to make an exception…

Read More

Workplace investigation reports: Why plain language is best

As a reviewer of workplace investigation reports, I try to encourage the use of plain language. By this, I mean that I try to make sure that a report can be easily understood by the people who read it. I admit that this is not always easy. I am a lawyer, after all, which means that I was trained to make everything sound more complicated than it really is.

Read More

Fatal flaws: 10 mistakes that can sink your workplace investigation report

In my role as review counsel, I train others on how to write effective workplace investigation reports.  When I review reports, much of what I focus on is readability: how is the report going to sound to the reader? Is it easy to read? Is the reader going to get confused by the report’s organization? I think about this mythical reader a lot; probably too much in fact, and I bet my colleagues are tired of hearing me go on about it.

Read More

A Q&A on writing workplace investigation reports

I recently did a three-part webinar series on writing workplace investigation reports with my colleague, Janice Rubin. These were short half-hour sessions during which participants could submit questions to us in writing. We had clearly underestimated how much we had to say about writing investigation reports and didn’t have time to get to the questions. In this blog, I answer some of the really good questions that we received.

Read More