Serious insight for serious situations.

Serious insight for serious situations.

Is Disparity Dishonesty? On the Dolly Parton Challenge and Credibility

Did you see the Dolly Parton Challenge meme that went viral in January 2020?
Initiated by American singer Dolly Parton, participants in the Challenge composite four photographs of themselves labelled, “LinkedIn”, “Facebook”, “Instagram”, and “Tinder”. The idea is that each photograph presents a version of the user that corresponds to a different professional, social, or romantic context. The humour in the meme lies in confessional self-awareness – a person can appear and act in one context in a way that might seem awkward or inappropriate in another.

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Taming Twitter: 5 ways to manage customer-driven harassment of employees on social media

For any modern, public-facing organization, a social media presence has come to feel less like a “nice feature” and more like an absolute “must-have” to stay competitive and relevant. In particular, today’s customers demand and, indeed, expect a social media platform where they can receive succinct, immediate, one-on-one support without having to interact with a

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Solicitation through social media

It is common practice in Ontario for employers to restrict a departing employee’s ability to solicit employer customers, suppliers, current employees, etc.  Although many such clauses specify particular actions that are prohibited, very few turn their mind to governing a departing employee’s actions on social media. As the Canadian courts have not yet ruled on

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Don’t Like Your “F**k A** Job”? Tweeting About it is Probably a Bad Idea

In the latest incident of an employee’s social media activity landing him/herself in hot water with an employer, media outlets reported earlier this week that a young woman in Texas was fired before her first day on the job, after allegedly tweeting the following: “Ew, I start this f**k a**job tomorrow.” The employee’s apparent disdain

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