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Serious insight for serious situations.

Serious insight for serious situations.

Investigating The Invisible: Examining Subtle Racial Discrimination (Part 2)

The concept of a “microaggression” has received significant attention in recent years, and was explored more fully in a previous post. At its core, a microaggression is a subtle, often unintentional, behaviour that is rooted in stereotypes about marginalized groups. Despite the absence of ill will, microaggressions in the workplace can nonetheless amount to discrimination or harassment.

However, the challenge for investigators arises in determining whether a seemingly innocuous comment or action was motivated by a discriminatory stereotype or bias. When examining such allegations, investigators may wish to rely on the broader context and circumstantial evidence in arriving at their conclusions.

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Investigating The Invisible: Examining Subtle Racial Discrimination (Part 1)

Overt racial discrimination, such as a racial slur or derogatory comment, can be easy to spot. However, the difficulty for investigators arises where an allegation of race-based discrimination seemingly does not relate to race at all. As discussed further in this post, such forms of discrimination (often dubbed “microaggressions”) are often manifested through subtle, unintentional behaviours that perpetuate stereotypes about marginalized groups.

The question then arises: how can allegations of subtle racial discrimination be investigated, let alone proven, where there is no obvious link to race? In the case study below, we outline considerations for investigators through the following scenario.

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Il, elle, iel ou ille? Quel langage neutre utiliser en français? | Gender neutral language in French, does it exist?

Lorsque j’étais membre du Tribunal des droits de la personne de l’Ontario, j’ai présidé à une audience qui se déroulait en anglais où une des parties désirait être identifiée par le pronom « they ». Et si l’audience s’était déroulée en français? Est-ce qu’il y a un terme correspondant? On le sait, la langue française n’est pas neutre; tout est forcément féminin ou masculin.

French is not a gender-neutral language, which presents added challenges when referring to individuals who identify as non-binary. There is no corresponding term to “they” in French. As noted by the Ontario Human Rights Commission, deliberately misusing pronouns can be a form of discrimination under the Human Rights Code.

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Health Care and Harassment: Now is the time to address unhealthy habits

Grey’s Anatomy – the television show and not the textbook – has been running for more seasons than I care to count.  All I know is that it has spanned several different stages of my educational and professional life and seems to have as strong a following as ever.   Not unlike the legal world, mining the hospital and health care environment for inspiration can yield highly entertaining programming.  One archetypal character that frequently appears in both drama and comedic form is the curmudgeonly demanding senior doctor. 

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